Tag Archives: tips

Money Talks: Part Three (And Final)

Let’s just go to McDonald’s (Maybe our cells won’t know the difference?)

“I know for a lot of people it’s all about the money. I was following some folks around SafeWay the other day as they Save money eating rightpicked up bacon, eggs, muffins, butter and then started adding it up. They tossed everything in the orange juice cooler and said, ‘Let’s just go to McDonalds!'”  (Tim Steele)

What’s wrong with McDonald’s?  Same thing that’s wrong with all processed foods.  Corn oil, hydrogenated soybean oil, high fructose corn syrup, autolyzed yeast extract, and dimethylpolysiloxane to start.  These are not the things that our cells use to function.  For every calcium they pull out to use, they’re having to figure out how to eliminate the dimethylpolysiloxane.  For every magnesium you ingest, they have to put out the fire (almost literally) from the corn oil and hydrogenated soybean oil being incorporated into your cells.  Years of this mistreatment, and the body finally succumbs to chronic diseases:  diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, depression, arthritis, and autoimmune disorders.  The body just is not getting enough of what it needs and the trash from what it doesn’t need is accumulating, causing disease.  Your doctor can’t change it.  Your husband can’t change it.  Only you can change it.

And if you have young children who can’t go to the grocery yet themselves, you can largely control the outcome of their health story.  Buying them good, whole, real foods.  Educating them.  Setting examples for them.  Staying the course, just for them.

Today is the last post on ways to try to make eating whole, real food a reasonable price.  Part I is here.  Part II is here.  And today is Part III.  Thanks for reading.

The Final Tips on How to Make Eating Right Affordable

If your family doesn’t eat leftovers well, then freeze them that night and label them to pull out later!  Then, next time you thaw and reheat them, serve them up attractively on plates so they don’t know they’re eating leftovers.

If you see veggies and fruits going spare in nature, ask!  We live in town, but people here still have apple trees and gardens.  It’s so sad to see tomatoes and apples rot in the October frost.  So if it’s getting to the end of the season, go ask if you can pick the apples, pears, and tomatoes going to waste!  Free is cheap.

Shop from a list to prevent any impulsive buys suggested by your own brain or kids.  My kids always ask for juice.  Is it on the list?  Is that what we came here for?  Uh.  No.  No juice.  It’s not really good for you anyhow.  Impulsive buys are usually expensive buys.  Make your list and stick to it to save money.

Shop around.  This is where time plays a role and makes budgeting a challenge.  But to trim costs, you really must shop around.

Fish.  No.  Not buy seafood.  That can be expensive.  But go fishing!  Go hunting!  Not your thing?  Bum food off of people who do!  Wild-caught food that you catch on your own saves money.

Eat only whole, real foods for health.  What?  I’m supposed to be telling you how to SAVE money!  How to make eating this way sustainable–not just repeat my by-line…BUT this one probably saves us the most money.  By eating this way, we dropped an average of probably 2.5 prescriptions per family member (We had terrible allergic rhinitis, all of us.).  Co-pays were running us about 10-20 dollars per prescription.  Let’s shoot low.  We were spending at least $125 per month on prescriptions.  At least.  I didn’t tally in over-the-counter stuff, antibiotics, and doctor’s visits.  Eating whole, real foods saves money by shedding prescriptions and doctor’s appointments.

Avert diabetes and high cholesterol.  For most of us, statistics clearly show we will be obese.  We will have diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and/or high cholesterol—these diseases travel in packs.  (That’s a bare minimum of three prescriptions.)  These are foods of chronic poor food choices in most all cases.  Choose real, whole foods which, yes, take effort to prepare.  I am NOT hearing it loud enough for my tastes yet.  You do not have to have these diseases.  It will take what today’s society considers drastic food changes, but they are not drastic when measured against what we’ve been eating for thousands and thousands of years.  Eating whole, real foods prepared with your own hands can reverse and prevent these chronic diseases.  You tally up the cost.  (Tip:  Look around you.  It’s exorbitant.)

Your Success

That’s all I have time for today.  I want you to succeed.  Your success opens up opportunities for other people.  When you feel good, you can give to the world in the way only you can.  I sincerely believe that.  I hope you have a great weekend.  I hope you have a great life.  McDonald’s and grain flours may be a bit cheaper and a lot less effort in the short run, but it’s ruining the function of your tissues and cells.

If you have any questions about how to get started on this journey which will require much more effort than money, ask away.  Your health depends on it.

And experienced passers-by and friends, leave your tips for others to learn from!  Thanks for prior tips and comments.  You’re the best!

 

~~Terri

Money Talks: Part Two

The garden

You can use money as an excuse to choose cheap, processed foods, but when you’re really ready to dive in I want you to know, it is simply an excuse.  Clear heads, energy, regular bowels, and pain-free joints–they do not come from a box.  I know I have lurkers who wonder if they can do this.  They wonder if they can commit.  Their spouse wants to know, “Can we do it on the same budget?”

You can.  You won’t break the bank.  Read on for more ways to make eating fresh, real food more economical.  Read yesterday’s post for more.  And tomorrow’s post for even more.  NO excuses.  Effort?  Yes.  Excuses?  That’s what they are:  excuses that enable bad eating.

Learn to cook

Let’s face it.  Four years ago, I was just a crummy cook who knew how to boil pasta and mix white flour, butter, and sugar.  Since then, I’ve learned how to use most all vegetables and spices.  My fear of fish and lamb are gone.  My fear of the grill is gone.  I’ve learned how to combine what’s left in my kitchen to something my family loves.  By learning to cook, you can buy sale items with confidence.  You can use cheaper cuts of meat and spices and transform a table to gourmet, although it costs less than steak and chicken breasts.  You’ll be able to eye a recipe quickly to decide if it’s a good fit for your family or not.  Find a friend and don’t be embarrassed to ask them to help you learn how to cook.  It will save you from ill-health and save you money.

Make homemade broth

Never spend money on packaged broth again!  Homemade broth just requires leftover scraps of meat, bones, and water (or leftover scraps of vegetables for you vegetarians).  Recycling at its finest!  You’re making something awesome out of food you’d normally just throw in the trash.  How’s that for saving money AND being quite the cook?  Make broth to add nutrition, flavor, and save money.

Count the cost of what you don’t buy:  soda pop, junk food, breakfast cereal, and meals out

Spend the next two months adding up the price of all the drinks, processed/packaged food, cereals, and meals you eat out.  Count it all up.  Every stinking penny of it.  Every quick run through the drive-through for a latte or Diet Coke.  What you tally up may surprise you!  Marketers want your money.  They’re probably getting it.  Especially if you use coupons.  Don’t see many coupons for kale.  Poor kale farmer.  Save money by not buying processed foods and meals out.

Start using the fat skimmed off of meat in place of oil:  bacon, lard, tallow

I used to drain all the fat and set it aside to trash when it cooled.  Now, I’m much more likely to save it in the pan to sauté some onions and broccoli in or store it in the fridge to use to sauté chicken in later.  The fats that we can save from cooking our meats, those are the fats that allow us to better absorb vitamin D and other “fat-soluble” vitamins that we need and are known to be deficient in.  I avoid vegetable oil, corn oil, Crisco, and margarine because they incorporate into our cells in “broken” forms which need fixed.  Using left-over drippings saves money, saves waste, and avoids use of rancid (spoiled) vegetable-derived oils.

Learn to can.  Do it with friends. 

It’s fun and creates good memories.  I have tons of memories of my mom, Aunt, and Grandma canning together.  Happy memories.  I have good memories of canning with good friends too.  Canning vegetables and fruits picked at peak nutrition saves money and creates lasting bonds with friends and families.

Buy lots of fruit in season. 

Then can it.  Cook it.  Freeze it.  Just get it when it’s cheap.  99 cents per pound.

Use co-ops and CSA baskets

Sometimes it takes a knowing a person to get you the information, but most communities now have co-ops and produce baskets where you get fresh-from-the-farm produce at a good price.  Amazingly, instead of complaining, most people I know love it when they get something they haven’t had before because they like to “figure it out.”  So if you’re willing to learn and experiment, these are great!  Ask around, getting fresh produce from a co-op or CSA basket saves significantly.

Drive to the farm

Straight from the source saves money.  And many like to chat.  I’ve learned so much from our 83 year-old farm woman about chickens, eggs, cows, and canning.  She is amazing.  Many farmers are talkers and love to share.  Buying food from the farm saves money.

Ask a friend to pledge to eat 90% whole, real foods with you

Having a comrade shares the joy, the pain, and the cost.  You can split bulk orders.  You can get together once a month and cook casseroles to freeze.  You can can together.  You can share good recipes.  Going in with a partner can save money.

Make soup so nothing goes to waste

Learning to use up everything in the kitchen saves money.  Soup is a great, economical way to stretch a budget.  Of course, you’ll need to learn to cook so you can figure out how to meld all those ingredients together.   But with the homemade broth, vegetables you froze from in season, and what’s going south in the fridge, you can make some very taste concoctions.  Soups are economical.

Skip those froo-froo drinks

Strangely, this one gets people!  Water just doesn’t do it for them.  Crazy how far we’ve come when water doesn’t sound good.  All purchased drinks seem to cost so much money, even bottled water (which is teeming with plastic run-off).  Save money and your health by sticking with water in a glass cup.

There are more

Oh, yes!  There are more tips tomorrow.  Have you been reading?  If so, which tip, in your mind may be the most important?  I’m almost bordering on the “Learn to cook” one.  Probably second is “Buy it in season.”  And probably the most important concept is gathering the drive and effort.  With drive and effort, nearly all barriers can be navigated.

 

~~Terri