Whole Grain Copycat Muffin

Grain-free gluten-free flax muffinsThis hearty muffin goes great with eggs for breakfast or with your soup for lunch!  It reminds me of a bran muffin, and the chia and sunflower seeds give it a whole grain like crunch!  It is not a sweet muffin, but the recipe can easily be adapted (omit the chia and sunflower seeds) to make this into a lemon poppy seed or orange-walnut cranberry muffin if you’re adventurous!  All yummy!

Sometimes when recipes I try from the internet don’t work out, I wonder what gives!  So I like to try to be clear in my directions; I want you to get the same results I do.  When I measured the dry ingredients, I was very particular for this recipe.  I gently tapped the measuring cups on the kitchen counter to get the flax and arrowroot powder to settle down.  Then I filled the cups again to the top and tapped again, leveling off if needed with a flat knife.  I have made this muffin with maple syrup, almond milk, and palm shortening substitutions.  I prefer to make this in our blender, but I’ve also made it with an electric hand mixer.  All of these variations work (the palm shortening requires lots of immersion), but the recipe as typed up below is what we prefer best and is the most tasty.

Whole Grain Copycat Muffin

Makes 10-12 muffins

1 cup of finely ground golden flax
1/2 cup arrowroot powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
2 T whole chia seeds
2 T chopped sunflower seeds
3 eggs
1/4 cup full fat coconut milk
1/4 cup honey
1/2 cup of olive oil

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Mix the dry ingredients in a small bowl.
  3. In the blender, blend together all of the wet ingredients.  (This may alternatively be done with an electric hand mixer or immersion stick blender.  Mix until the wet ingredients are well-blended and bubbly.)
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients in the blender and blend until well mixed.
  5. Pour into lined muffin tins.  I fill the muffin cups about 3/4 full.  I get 10-12 muffins.
  6. Bake for approximately 15 minutes.  Ovens vary greatly so monitor and check for doneness with a toothpick or knife inserted in the center.

Family “gustar” report:  6/6.  I was happy the now finicky toddler ate them!  My husband liked them drizzled with a little honey.  The older kids liked them plain.

I hope you have a wonderful day today!  I hope it is filled with peace that comes from inside!  Listen to the clues your body and mind give you to make changes to develop a life full of gratitude and joy!

Signing off,

Terri

What Could Joint Pain Have in Common with ADHD?

wpid-IMAG0804.jpgOne of my daughters is sensitive to gluten.  I knew it made her seasonal allergies worse, but I didn’t realize some of its other effects until she shared them with me.  When she did, it tore my heart out.  She said, “Mom, when I eat that stuff, it makes me really sad.  I cry and I can’t fall to sleep at night.”  Whoa.

Research indicates that one in 133 people have celiac disease (a serious, destructive autoimmune disorder to gluten) in the USA and 6% have gluten-sensitivity (The exact mechanism is still being determined but it does not appear to be destructive like celiac disease–but symptoms may be just as uncomfortable!).  The proteins in gluten are very, very, very difficult proteins for our bodies to digest.  So what?  Haven’t they always been?  Well, this has become more problematic in our current time as the bacteria we humans rely on to guard our gut linings have been terrorized by antibiotics, food preservatives, and reliance on processed foods.  When the proteins are not broken down properly, our immune systems can be triggered in different ways.  Some people’s bodies handle this in stride.  Others do not, and each person will have his own unique response resulting in different symptoms.

Please remember, my articles are never intended for medical advice.  I observe.  I study.  I read.  I write up what I think is interesting and others may benefit from reading.  It’s your job to be safe, talk to your doctor, and be a diligent bulldog for your health.

Three Reasons Doctors Shun the Gluten-Free Idea 

If gluten is such an issue, why doesn’t your doctor tell you about it?  There are a few reasons.  One, it is easy to dismiss a gluten-free diet because research on atypical celiac presentation and gluten-sensitivity is slow to trickle down to doctors practicing in the community.  They aren’t going to jump on the bandwagon simply for some article that shows up in your USA Today.  However, research studies and case reports abound on the negative effects of gluten and other wheat proteins and the changing face of celiac disease.  Alessio Fasano, MD and colleagues have made amazing discoveries about celiac disease, gluten-sensitivity, wheat allergy, and gluten in general.  Your decision on wheat would be remiss if you didn’t consider Dr. Fasano’s work.  On the other hand, he is fairly conservative, but I think that is what has allowed his ideas to surface so quickly and to be well-received by the stubborn medical community.

Secondly, gluten problems can appear so differently from person to person!  Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity can cause diverse symptoms, and frustratingly there is no objective test for gluten sensitivity.  Nowadays, celiac disease is presenting with strange, atypical symptoms which doctors are not prepared to identify!  It’s a tough gluten-disorder diagnostic world!  I have a friend whose mother was diagnosed with celiac disease a couple of years ago–and her mom is in her 70s!  No doctor was thinking of this until the poor woman drove to the Mayo ER and said, “I’m not leaving this hospital till you figure out what’s wrong with me!”

And thirdly, the glut of gluten-free processed food products on the market targeting susceptible consumers is preposterous and attack-worthy.  People associate gluten-free with healthy.  No.  Gluten-free oranges are healthy.  Gluten-free broccoli is healthy.  Gluten-free shrimp are healthy.  But gluten-free bread and gluten-free cookies are not.

And lastly (I know I said “a few,” but I just thought of this one.), most patients and most doctors think a gluten-free lifestyle is too hard.

What Symptoms Would I Look for to Consider a Gluten-Disorder?

What kind of symptoms would a gluten-sensitive person experience?  I’ve listed some.  Maybe you’ll see something here on your health record or that of a loved one.  My list is not conclusive.  I realize now I left off skin disorders, like eczema.

    • Joint pain and swelling: Gluten-sensitive people may present with pain and swelling in one or more joints. The understanding of how and why this happens is not clear yet. The symptoms may not occur right away after gluten is eaten (It can take several days.), and this delayed onset can make diagnosis confusing. Besides causing joints to become painful and swollen, gluten can also make known arthritis more painful, including rheumatoid arthritis.
    • Stomach troubles: Some people will have irritable bowel symptoms with stomach pain, bloating, and diarrhea. Others will simply have stubborn constipation. It is not understood why some people get diarrhea and others get constipation, but recent studies show that a gluten-free diet can help these digestive symptoms.
    • Fibromyalgia and fatigue symptoms: Sometimes people develop painful muscles as a negative response to gluten. The severe muscle aches can be debilitating and receive a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, usually accompanied by chronic fatigue. Gluten-removal for some people helps eliminate or reduce this chronic pain and fatigue. Severe fatigue and tiredness can occur, too, without the muscle aches, and again, gluten removal wonderfully helps some people regain their vitality.
    • Headaches: Some people will get headaches with gluten exposure, but in addition, they may also have dizziness and a “fogginess” in their head that they cannot shake no matter how much sleep or caffeine they get. Imagine their satisfaction when they wake up headache-free and clear-headed for the first time in years.
    • ADHD and autism symptoms: Removing gluten from a child’s diet is challenging in today’s world, but studies do suggest that removal can help ADHD and autism symptoms. However, in autism, the studies are done most often with a combination of gluten and dairy removal, and so it is hard to attribute the improvement to gluten over dairy.
    • Depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder: There is no doubt that the diagnosis of mental illness is tragically on the rise. Amazingly, some people find relief from these mental illnesses with simple dietary changes such as gluten removal. But how many people with depression or anxiety are prescribed dietary changes such as a gluten-free diet? Not many. Depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder (a disease which alternates between high, energetic, sometimes delusional symptoms and extreme depression), schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (a disease where a person has repetitive thoughts and actions they cannot remove from their minds) may be the prime symptoms for some gluten-sensitive individuals.  Personally, I know a bipolar patient who told me, “I am NOT giving up my morning toast, Terri.”  Okay then.

If you have chronic, troubling symptoms, don’t wait for your doctor to tell you that you have gluten-sensitivity or atypical celiac disease.  Ask your doctor to please evaluate you or your child for celiac disease and then ask if it is safe for you to proceed to a gluten-free diet.  Don’t be deterred if your doctor dismisses your concern and belittles your endeavors.  Your doctor may think going gluten-free will not work–and maybe it will not–but there is plenty of research to support your trial.  But first make sure there is not celiac disease!  A celiac patient should not even use the same toaster that has toasted gluten-containing products!  A celiac patient must know where “maltodextrin” came from.

Closing

What questions do you have?  I know this diet stuff is confusing and immensely complex.  And I know that’s a part of what makes people throw their hands up and go eat whatever their little, ol’ tongues desire.  I understand that.  I get it.  But I also know the statistics, and I know that gluten affects some of my own family members.  So does my daughter ever eat gluten?  She does, usually on vacation or at birthdays or potlucks.  She acknowledges an unusual passion for gluten products, and she has asked me (I did not suggest it.  I lead by example and try to teach my kids information and good observation so they can make good decisions their whole lives through.  I hope my daughters never have eating disorders and intend to do all I can to promote a positive relationship to food.) to help her moderate portions and to not order certain things on vacation or special dinners out.  She is becoming her own health advocate.  Please become yours.

Terri

PS:  My take on gluten and grains is much, much more complex than these mere 1000 words allow.  But I hope this article raises awareness that gluten can definitely be a problem!  (Of course, so can other foods as well.  And this leads us to leaky gut.  And so on.  This stuff is so fascinating.)

Sources:

  1. Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity and Autoimmunity: A Case Report.  Isasi C, Colmenero I, Casco F, et al.  European Journal of Case Reports in Internal Medicine.   EJCRIM.  2014;1
  2. Spectrum of gluten-related disorders: consensus on new nomenclature and classification.  Sapone A, Bai JC, Ciacci C, et al.  BMC Medicine.  2012. 10:13.
  3. Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten-Sensitivity. Jackson JR, Eaton WW, Cascella NG, et al.  Psychiatric Quarterly.  March 2012, Volume 83, Issue 1, pp91-102.
  4. Fibromyalgia and non-gluten sensitivity: a description with remission of fibromyalgia.  Isasi C, Colmenero I, Casco F, et al.  Rheumatology International.  2014; 34 (11):  1607-1612.
  5. Fasano, Alessio and Susie Flaherty.  Gluten Freedom.  Wiley, 2014.

What’s Eating Up My Blogging Time?

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Photo kindly from Molly Green Magazine, as part of a membership.

I wanted to tell here, at The Homeschooling Doctor, my story.  What is my story?  Well, it’s about a woman leaving behind an ordinary medical doctor career to stay home and homeschool her children.  It’s a story about her leaving behind expected medical doctor ideas to unearth new ideas (new to her anyhow) for health and healing.  And it’s a story of a struggle to align expectations with a gracious acceptance of reality.

I haven’t written for at least a couple of weeks for two reasons.  One, I’ve been following a new, interesting experiment to help put an end to my search for “complete health.”  You see, I’m pretty darn healthy.  But over the years, I’ve had intermittent headaches, foggy brain, vertigo, strange joint pains and swelling, abdominal distention/bloating, and chronic constipation.  I’m diligent, and I’ve visited the appropriate doctors.  The work-ups are really, overall, quite unremarkable.  So, I’ve chalked it up to stress or food or wear-and-tear and I’ve simply moved on, trying not to ruminate for too long on any of it–although I keep reading and reading because I love to learn and think about how this stuff may help myself or others.

By self-experimenting, I’ve found that if I eat a certain way, which coincidentally aligns fairly well with a vegetable-rich autoimmune Paleo diet, I can control about all my symptoms.  But to eat this way for life as a mother of four young kids who loves to travel, well, it’s pretty discouraging.  So, although I haven’t had time to write on it, over the last couple of years, I’ve been trying to budge off of “my diet.”  I mean, eliminating grains, nuts/seeds, dairy, eggs, legumes, chicken, and coconut is, in my own words, about stupid.  I’m not saying I’m stupid.  Or you’re stupid.  I guess I’m just saying that to eat that way long-term is almost, not quite, impossible.  Which means for people who have to follow this way of eating, makes feeling good day-in and day-out about impossible.  I’ve tried many of the leaky gut protocols.  I’ve considered Lymes and heavy metals.  I’ve fasted.  I’ve done broths.  Meditation and yoga.  I’ve sent love and acceptance to my gut and body.  Probably my first mistake was to pray about it–I think God thought it would be good for this run-of-the-mill, proud medical doctor to get shaken up a little.  Anyhow, I think the autoimmune diet protocols are awesome at controlling symptoms quickly, but somehow I can’t keep wondering if some of us who follow these protocols can’t move on.

(Please remember, this is all my story.  My opinions.  My thoughts.  I haven’t even organized my thoughts well in my own head.  So anything you read here, you need to read about more and ask your doctor about anything that you may want to try.)

Well, my blog posting and reading has been replaced since my last post here with reading a medical doctor’s work by the last name of Sarno on a syndrome he calls tension myositis syndrome and trying his techniques.  He suggests that lots of symptoms and syndromes in medicine are able to be overcome by some pretty simple processes involving reading his books, daily journaling, and daily introspective thinking.  He writes a lot about back pain and other musculoskeletal disorders (carpal tunnel, tendonitises, herniated disks, etc.), but I’ve decided to apply his techniques to my food sensitivities, which commonly cause me headaches, fogginess in my head, and bloating.  I cannot yet give a definitive answer to how it’s going, but I am broadening my diet.  I do not suggest that you try Sarno until you’ve hit the wall and tried “everything” or unless you’re a very open-minded person.  (And of course after you checked with your doctor about whether or not it’s safe to eat these foods or do these activities you avoid!  I’m not talking anaphylactic allergies here!!!!)  I’m open-minded, but I would not have even considered this man’s work at all when I started this journey in 2012.  His explanations seem bizarre to us doctors trained to look at X-rays, MRIs, and use known science to explain pain.  I’m early on in trying his techniques, but I think that the brain can override most processes in the body:  vascular, gastrointestinal, immunological, pain sensation, and so on.  Perhaps his methods are one way to achieve this end.  Bottom-line–I just wanted to let you know that the extra reading and journaling that are required daily have eaten up my blogging time lately.

The second thing that has cut into researching and writing for my blog is the time-constraints placed on a mom by, hmm, how should I say this–being a mom.  Ha!  I had completely forgotten how time and mom-consuming toddlers are!  I keep playing with our schedule and routine to find a way to write more, but success keeps eluding me.  I enjoy reading, summarizing this health stuff, and encouraging others so much, though, that I plan to persist on finding a way to keep in the game.  This week, we’re going to try having my daughters each pick meals to cook to see if I can’t decrease my kitchen responsibilities.  Maybe this will open up some more writing time.

That’s what’s been happenin’ here lately.  I didn’t link to Sarno’s work.  I figure if you’re at the point to try him, you’ll open a new tab and type his name in.  And I want to make it clear I don’t agree with all I read in his book, but so far with his methods, I’ve been able to abort most headaches, fogginess, and inappropriate tiredness as I move off of my autoimmune-style diet.  The methods stir up a lot of emotions and past family trash–so fair warning.

Happy Monday.  The day where we leave our rest and go find some good work to do.

And thank you, Molly Green Magazine Membership, for the lovely photo and quote to use at the beginning of this post.

Terri

Don’t Look Back: 15 Real Tips to Healthy Eating for Families

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“Terri, how in the world did you get your family to eat this stuff?  I just don’t think mine will do it.”

A real response to a real question.  Excerpted from personal correspondence with a  friend.  May you enter 2016 with renewed vigor for all things good for you and your family:

  1. Accept that changing your family’s diet to a truly real-food-based diet will be the hardest thing you have ever done to this point.

    You will be challenged on every single front.  By your kids.  By schools.  By churches.  At the grocery store.  By grandparents.  Watching TV.  Even by yourself lots of times.

  2. Realize you can’t do it without the support of your husband.

    If he’s not on track with you in these changes, you’ll most likely fail.

  3. It’s a lot easier if you have a distinct plan in mind. 

    For some people, they need to go buy a book with a named diet to help them know what and how to eat.  For example, some people like to read and go by The Daniel Plan or a book called Gut and Psychology Syndrome or by the internet site 100 Days of Real Food.  You don’t have to have a named plan, but I think you need to definitely define your boundaries.  Or you’ll fail when your kids back you against a wall.  Lay out the rules so YOU know!  Such as, “We will eat NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS.  Period.  We will eat NOTHING WITH ADDED SUGAR.  Period.  We will eat nothing with ADDED PRESERVATIVES.  Period.”  And so on.

  4. It will be crucial to learn how to cook. 

    Most of us get sick of raw food.  I know I’ve learned how to make fish, roasts, and even grill!  I pretty much stuck with eating and cooking chicken breast before our change (Limiting greatly the kinds of nutrients we got–there’s so much more to chicken that we need than is in the breast—same with beef–steak has a certain amino acid profile and other cuts have different amino acid profiles–and we ideally need them all!!!  Yet all we eat is the “muscle” meats and toss the rest.  A waste.  And a detriment to our body.).  I’ve also gotten a huge vegetable repertoire.  You will need to learn some basic recipes that people like so that nobody starves.

  5. Most people are result driven, so look for results.

    For us, it was a HUGE improvement in stomach aches, headaches, poop issues, nasal allergies, reflux, attention abilities, and sleep improvement.  We did initially cut out grains and dairy, but we have now introduced very high quality dairy and select whole grains.  You won’t find colors, sugar, preservatives, or added vitamins to our dairy products…for whole grains, I mean the chunky stuff.  :-)  Not a processed substance which says whole grain.

  6. Don’t look back. 

    When I was wishy-washy, my kids would sense it and push me backwards.  Finally, my husband put his foot down one day and said to them in a steely voice, “This is the way we eat now.”  A united house stands.

  7. If you’ve defined your “rules,” then you ought to be able to explain them to your kids. 

    And you’re going to need to know a tad bit of science as to why.  Like “…there are studies that link red food dye with the brain not functioning the way it needs to, especially in kids.  So we don’t eat that.  It’s a chemical anyhow just added to make you want it and think it’s pretty.  But the body has to do something with it!!!  And it isn’t naturally occurring and so the body doesn’t exactly know what to do with it!”  And “…we have to eat a fresh green vegetable every single day because it has folate it in to help our brains function and to help our white blood cells fight off germs.  We get sick less when we eat lots of natural folate!”  And “…we don’t eat food with added synthetic vitamins…the synthetic forms don’t fit into our body’s chemical reactions the way the forms do from food!” 

  8. All snacks need to be a vegetable or fruit.

    [This is how we started.  The kids eat great day-in and day-out finally, and now we deviate from this rule.  But it was strict at first.]

  9. Fill them up with fats. 

    This works well if they do well with butter.  Our allergies come back with butter, but maybe yours wouldn’t.  Butter is NOT bad.  It has been vindicated, although you haven’t heard much about that!  Natural saturated fats have been vindicated.  BUT vegetable oils, peanut oils, corn oils, Crisco, margarine, etc are the devil for our cells.  SO bad!  Even more demonic when heated for hours like at a restaurant.  Kills me just thinking about it.  ANYHOW, fill them up with…butter on their veggies or on their meats…Moms always tell me, “They’ll starve.”  Well, they won’t if you add extra fat to what they will eat.  Then, eventually you’ll transition away from this as they adjust to new foods.

  10. Make them find one veggie they’ll eat. 

    They can’t say no to all of them.  Then, later, make them pick another.  If you make a vegetable they don’t like, at first just put those ones on your plate and you eat them.  Then later on, put one tiny piece on their plate.  They don’t have to even eat it!  It just has to sit there.  Then, eventually make them taste it.  (This can happen over 3-4 months!)  Then– every time they must take the mandatory bite.  (Remember lots of butter!!!!!  Butter helps the body to absorb certain minerals and vitamins from veggies better too!)

  11.  If you think it doesn’t matter, you won’t succeed. 

    It won’t be important enough to you.  But I’m here to tell you it does matter.  I started a little blog to try to convince people it does matter.  I have some science posts on there.  But it matters.  You can always e-mail me and ask me how to explain why we should eat XYZ to your kids and why we shouldn’t eat QRS.  I don’t mind a bit!   I usually know!  I’ve made it my mission!

  12. Get a meal plan ready for when you start and go at it. 

    Work from those recipes and foods you have prepared for the plan that week.  You can sometimes buy plans on-line.  I have some cookbooks you could borrow for a  couple of weeks if you want to make copies.  I can lend you recipes we love.  [Mmm.  Clearly this has internet logistical challenges, but I’m happy to share favorite recipes or books here on The HSD.]

  13. Did I say that the kids will have a HARD time? 

    You may want to start out just doing it in your house only.  “Inside our house we will eat this way.”  Later, the kids will self-select because they can see what red food dye or wheat does to them!

  14. Should you eat down the cupboards or give it away?

    Your call.  Depends on your finances.  But stop buying dead, processed food.

  15. Don’t let set-backs be go-backs. 

    You’ll have bad days and weeks of food choices.  But regroup and get back despite the fussing.

Does this help?  Maybe not.  But feel free to ask specific questions and I’ll see what I can do…You’ll get them there.  I did.  My kids are great now.  I’m really proud of them and the habits they’ll have FOREVER…[We] want an easy way.  There is no easy way in life for things that are beautiful and worth it!  Even a sunrise requires you to get out of bed early.  Hugs!

Terri

[Good-bye 2015!  Happy 2016 to all!  Make this the year to stick with it for a lifetime.  Failure is a chance to start again with new, improved tactics in mind.  You CAN do this!]

Christmas Greetings From Our Family

Christmas greetings

This little light of mine, I’m gonna’ let it shine.

This little light of mine, I’m gonna’ let it shine.

This little light of mine, I’m gonna’ let it shine.

Let it shine.  Let it shine.  Let it shine…

I hope you are somehow blessed today, even if you’re hurting inside.

Thank you to those who have touched my life and the life of my wonderful family.

Eat right.  Eat real.

Live right.  Live real.

Be strong.

Merry, merry Christmas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bad Pancake Days

PancakesYou can usually tell what kind of day it’s going to be by your response to the breakfast pancakes.  I can remember watching my sister flip pancakes for the first time and how irritated she got.  Sometimes, it’s just not as easy as it looks.  The first pancake is usually sacrificed to heat and oil calibration.  It’s so ugly, nobody will eat the first one.  Then, on a good day, you get the temperature adjusted or add a little more oil, and you’re good-to-golden-pancakes go.  But some days, none of those blasted pancakes want to do anything right.  They fold and they burn.  You step away from the kitchen for a moment (or ten), and they’re scorched.  Toasted.  These are bad days; you can always see it coming.  The whole rest of the day is usually just trash.  All because of those stupid pancakes.  So much easier when everybody just eats bananas for breakfast.  Why do kids think they need pancakes?  Why?  They’re not even that healthy for you.

Today, I was having a bad pancake morning.  The kind where you wham your spatula into every single pancake in the pan to help it along on its destructive journey.  Wham.  Wham.  My first two pancakes wouldn’t flip and I was about to wham them.  Then, an unseen force held my arm in high swing: “Turn this day around.”  Hmmm.  Can I?  I stopped.  I critically analyzed the situation and decided to do three very logical, productive things:

  1.  Turn up the heat a little.
  2.  Make sure there was oil distributed where I poured pancake batter.
  3.  Get a bigger spatula.

Beautiful golden pancakes that my daughters adored all the way to the last bit of batter.

I’m busy.  I don’t want to make pancakes.  My heart isn’t in it. 

The pancakes know it, and they mirror that and self-destruct.  I’ve decided–those darn pancakes are simply an early day self-reflection of my attitude.  If I can turn my attitude around and analyze the situation early, my day will go a whole lot better.

Is there too much heat?  Too much stress.  Too much going on.  Maybe I need to turn it down.

Is there not enough heat?  Maybe I’m lackluster.  I’ve blowing things off that need me.  Maybe I need to get on the ball and throw myself into a situation.

Am I rushing in to flip too fast?  I’m too impatient.  Thinking I can hurry things along which just shouldn’t be hurried.  I need to back off, killer.

Am I filling up the time with other stuff, not flipping thus in time, and burning the pancakes?  I don’t seriously know why I think I can shower and make pancakes at the same time.  Why do I?  Why do I think I can take on so many things and then get frustrated when my family seems to implode?

Am I making them too big?  Sometimes, the stairway and mantle Christmas decorations need to be kept in the storage box for the year.  Or the tomatoes need to not be canned.  There are simply times to scale projects down.

Do I need more oil?  Sometimes, a little down-time and pampering are needed.  A little self-TLC (not THC).  If I don’t take care of myself, I won’t be caring for others.  And everybody needs me in their problems–you know, right?–ha!– so I’d better take care of myself!

Do I need less oil?  Sometimes I can drown in self-pity and self-entitlement.  Oh, me.  Oh, my.  Why-oh-why?  Probably days I can let that go.  Pancakes don’t do well with too much oil drowning them, and neither do I.

It’s not the pancakes.  It’s me. 

Slow down.  Speed up.  Lube life up a little more or a little less.  Turn up the heat.  Turn down the heat.  Stay focused on the pancakes and life will be golden.

Did you know that making pancakes could be such a challenging and thought-stimulating production?  This stay-at-home gig is better than a paid college course in psychology.  I never do know why colleges charge so much per credit hour.

What activity in your daily life is trying to tell you something?

What mundane activity in your life commonly reflects your inner mood?  Have any?  Care to share?

Terri